When Can I Start Signing With My Little One?

I am often asked, “When can I start signing with my child?” The answer is never the same for each family, as each parent has their own reasons for using baby sign language their family.

Based on child development, babies are ready for signing when they start moving their eyes and head to track toys or their parents face. This shows they are interested in learning and ready to start communicating with you! When you start signing, your child may show you many new reactions. This could be a frustrated or confused face, an interested expression, moving their hands in different ways, or smiling. These are all good indications that your child is trying to figure out what you are saying with your hands. Keep using American Sign Language and soon your child will be signing back!

Most baby & toddler sign language instructors recommend waiting until your child is between the ages of 4 to 6 months of age. Children are meeting important milestones during this time including: eye contact, purposeful movement of arms/hands, and beginning to find new ways to engage with their parents such as squealing, smiling, cooing and babbling.

Parents may decide to start signing earlier or later. In fact, we have had children as young as 2 weeks up to 2.5 years of age in her classes. Basically parents can start signing with their baby or toddler when ready!

A key point about signing, is to be consistent! Start signing with 2-5 words, consistently during the day. However, add more ASL in every week as your child is wanting to learn more. Finally, watch your child for signing approximations and when they start signing or moving their hands to approximate a sign, reward them with praise or what they were asking for!

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Wednesday’s Word!

Wednesday’s ASL baby sign word of the week:
What are these two parents signing?

surprised

This is an activity that is used in the emotions theme in Level I. Emotional vocabulary is so important to help children identify their feelings. Join us for an upcoming baby sign class or sensory class starting in May. Space is limited due to demand of programs!!

Tuesday’s Signing Tip – Week 2 out of 5

This is the second out of five weeks of signing tips!

2. Take your child’s hand and show how it feels to make the sign!

This is a great tip to use to help encourage your child to continue signing. One sign that parents find to use hand over hand signing or manipulation of signs is the sign “more”. When your signing “more”, you can take your little’s hand and show them how it feels to make the sign. Then respond by giving your little what they are wanting. This sign is great for food related aspects!

cropped-moon-sand1.jpg

Sensory Fun Play with Little Hands & Me in Saskatoon

Today is Friday FunDay!

As I am writing this blog, the sun is shining on me and I am so warm. Spring and Easter are just around the corner. Here is a fun spring sensory bin that can be easily created in your home.

What ASL signs can be used for play and exploration of this sensory bin?

easter bin

 
This bin is filled with shredded paper and plastic eggs (different sizes) allowing for increased brain development and fine motor skill improvement. The paper could be tempting for some children to put in their mouths. However, as ALWAYS, sensory play is well supervised parenting time! 

When Can I Start Signing with My Baby?

I am often asked, “When can I start signing with my child?” The answer is never the same for each family, as each parent has their own reasons for using #babysignlanguage  their family.

Based on child development, babies are ready for signing when they start moving their eyes and head to track toys or their parents face. This shows they are interested in learning and ready to start communicating with you! When you start signing, your child may show you many new reactions. This could be a frustrated or confused face, an interested expression, moving their hands in different ways, or smiling. These are all good indications that your child is trying to figure out what you are saying with your hands. Keep using American Sign Language and soon your child will be signing back!

Most baby & toddler sign language instructors recommend waiting until your child is between the ages of 4 to 6 months of age. Children are meeting important milestones during this time including: eye contact, purposeful movement of arms/hands, and beginning to find new ways to engage with their parents such as squealing, smiling, cooing and babbling.

Parents may decide to start signing earlier or later. In fact, we have had children as young as 2 weeks up to 2.5 years of age in her classes. Basically parents can start signing with their baby or toddler when ready!

A key point about signing, is to be consistent! Start signing with 2-5 words, consistently during the day. However, add more ASL in every week as your child is wanting to learn more. Finally, watch your child for signing approximations and when they start signing or moving their hands to approximate a sign, reward them with praise or what they were asking for!

Happy Parenting,

Baby Sign Language – Wednesday’s ASL Word

In classes, I encourage families to introduce new signs each week. This is usually based on our new weekly theme. Your little one’s first signs maybe very surprising! For example: Mr E’s second word was “light” followed by “fan”! Miss K’s second word was “puppy” at just 7 months of age.

 

What is Mr. E signing?

share

Keep learning new signs and find fun ways to sign, play & explore with our little one!

 

(Hint: Mr. E is signing “share”)

Puppet Sensory Play in Baby & Mom Baby Sign Language Class in Saskatoo

Little Hands & Me Parenting Network offers the Award Winning Parent Tested Parent Approved “My Smart Hands” curriculum to families in Saskatoon for the past 3 years!

Tanya brings whole child developmental activities into each class to make learning baby sign language (ASL signs) fun, educational and multi-sensory! Here is a “Food Monster” puppet that comes to visit our Level I class in the third week.