Song/Tapping Activity for Tiny Tots Sensory Class in Saskatoon

What is the Tiny Tots Sensory class?

This is a class all about play and sensory based learning! Here is just one sensory activity/song that we will use in class.

Your little will learn through sensory play through various sensory baskets, painting, sensory bins, scarf play, ribbons, balls pits, bubbles, water play, and  shakers and other items while supporting this learning though various signs. Also, included in this multi-sensory program are take home activities: paint bags, salt dough hand-prints and a sensory box.

 

Advertisements

Wednesday’s Word- Giraffe

 

Wednesday’s Word this week is “GIRAFFE”. How many of you have Sophie the GIRAFFE or a similar toy in the box in the living room or bedroom.

Take the GIRAFFE toy and hold it up to your child to see if it become interesting to them. Then when your little is watching the toy, move it UP and DOWN. Sign GIRAFFE often as you use the English word as well!

 

 

Little Hand and Me?!

Here is a video explaining why I switched our name to Little Hands and Me Parenting Network. Watch the whole video for an awesome bonus just for you and your family!

 

 

Please let me know if there are any questions!

 

Warmly,

Tanya Myrfield-Wolfe BSW, RSW, Certified Baby Sign Language Instructor and Baby Wearing Conultatant

Tuesday’s Tip From Little Hands and Me

Each Tuesday we will have a Tuesday’s Tip related to baby sign language!

Did you know that studies show using ASL and English allows little one’s to process language using both sides of their brains? How neat and easy to promote whole child development!

What are two new signs you will be using with your little this week?

signing W

Mr E and I working on finger spelling for the word “Halloween”. I am using the “W” hand in this picture.

Signing with your little one, from infancy through toddler-hood and into preschool age, is a fun, exciting way to increase language skills, pre-literacy, and whole child interaction.

Baby Sign Language Promotes Early Language Skills!

I enjoy hearing stories about how signing has positively impacted a family and how they are able to communicate with their young children. The best complements are when I see signing families in the community and they share how using baby sign language impacted their family is a positive way.

However, there some parents express concern that using ASL signs with their children may delay natural speech and language. The short answer is no! I think the confusion is due to the fact there is often confusion between  speech and language. Here is a great link explaining the difference:

http://www.playingwithwords365.com/2012/01/what-is-the-difference-between-speech-and-language/  (this blogger is a Speech and Language Pathologist).

When a child is using baby sign language (ASL signs) they are using language, and bridging the gap to meaningful communication! How wonderful is is that a non-verbal baby or a late talking toddler is able to use a true language to communicate their needs and have a sense of empowerment over their environment?

The Mayo Clinic promotes the use of Baby Sign Language stating, “Baby sign language — when babies use modified gestures from American Sign Language — can be an effective communication tool. Teaching and practicing baby sign language also can be fun and give you and your child an opportunity to bond.”

To read full article:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/infant-and-toddler-health/expert-answers/baby-sign-language/faq-20057980

Our classes are also language rich as teach baby sign language through music, signing, movement, sensory activities. we encourage parents to constantly talk with their children while using baby sign language to support and encourage verbal English.

Please feel free to ask me any questions!

Invitation to Play!

This past week’s classes we were discussing the importance of play and exploration. A conversation came up regarding a type of play called invitations to play, or invitations for learning, or play exploration. I thought that this would be a good topic for this week’s blog.

What is an Invitation to Play?

This is an intentional and planned collection of materials that a parent/caregiver prepares and sets up with which a child plays and explores. Invitation to play is an open invitation for a child to use as they desire. This can be a sensory basket, organized colour bins, paint daps, and much more.

block sensory bin

Kaila is exploring sensory balls in a pit. She is learning colours, shapes, patterns and different feels of the objects.

 

How Children Learn?

Children are sensory learners. This means that children learn though: tasting, touching/feeling, seeing, hearing and smelling. Parents can encourage child’s learning by setting up an invitation to play, watch their child explore and then begin to talk and sign with their child.

20 months old

Sorting play. This invitation to play can be used as colour sorting or item sorting based on child’s need to explore and discover

How can you use American Sign Language signs during play?

There are three main ways to learn: visual, auditory and kinesthetic. Using sign language with your child allows for all three types of learning. Your child is learning though their visual (sight) by seeing the sign. Auditory learnings see their parents use the American Sign Language signs while saying the English word. Kinesthetic learners move their hands to communicate before they are able to express themselves through language.

16 months old

Colour and shape recognition invitation to play.

If you provide your child with an egg carton filled with 6 different coloured plastic eggs. You many watch your child explore “opening” and “shutting” the container, they may take the eggs “in” and “out”. A child’s learning is supported by their parents/caregivers. When you see a child begin to explore, act like a broadcaster saying what the child is doing while signing key words. For example “Elijah, you took the yellow egg out of the container and put in the blue egg”. (ASL signs that maybe used are in bold).

Another idea is a winter sensory basket. This can filled with “white” cotton balls, “blue” pom poms, snowflakes, snowmen. As a parent, you can have an idea of how your child will play with these times. You may want to have them practice fine motor skills and provide a shovel and pot or have them feel the different textures of the pom poms, cotton balls and the hard plastic snowflakes. An example of signing and talking: “Those soft balls are blue, the white balls feellike fluff. Can you put the ball in the pail? Oh, you took the ball out!

What to Remember About Invitations to Play?

All types of sensory play, invitations to play and play exploration is well supervised time. There can be many choking hazards in this type of play. This does not mean it is not safe, it means that parents have to be engaging in play with the child to ensure safety.

Examples of Invitations to Play!

.

 

14 months

Sensory bin focused on fine motor skills

Photo 5

This invitation to play was set up to show the difference between soft and hard toys. As everyone can see, climbing on the basket was much more fun.

DSCN2650

Playing with hand crafted stones- focused on shape sorting fromhttp://www.artinstones.com/

DSCN2655

Pattern play with natural rocks from http://www.artinstones.com/